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Posts tagged ‘NetHogs’

Repost: NetHogs – Monitor Per Process Network Bandwidth Usage in Real Time

NetHogs Command Line Options

Following are the nethogs command line options. Using ‘-d‘ to add a refresh rate and ‘device name‘ to monitor specific given device or devices bandwidth (default is eth0). For example, to set 5 seconds as your refresh rate, then type the command as.

# nethogs -d 5
$ sudo nethogs -d 5

To monitor specific device (eth0) network bandwidth only, use the command as.

# nethogs eth0
$ sudo nethogs eth0

To monitor network bandwidth of both eth0 and eth1 interfaces, type the following command.

# nethogs eth0 eth1
$ sudo nethogs eth0 eth1
Other Options and Usage
-d : delay for refresh rate.
-h : display available commands usage.
-p : sniff in promiscious mode (not recommended).
-t : tracemode.
-V : prints Version info.

NetHogs Interactive Controls

Following are some useful interactive controls (Keyboard Shortcuts) of nethogs program.

-m : Change the units displayed for the bandwidth in units like KB/sec -> KB -> B-> MB.
-r : Sort by magnitude of respectively traffic.
-s : Sort by magnitude of sent traffic.
-q : Hit quit to the shell prompt.

Learn More

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Installing NetHogs on CentOS

NetHogs is a small ‘net top’ tool. Instead of breaking the traffic down per protocol or per subnet, like most tools do, it groups bandwidth by process. NetHogs does not rely on a special kernel module to be loaded. If there’s suddenly a lot of network traffic, you can fire up NetHogs and immediately see which PID is causing this. This makes it easy to indentify programs that have gone wild and are suddenly taking up your bandwidth. – NetHogs (http://nethogs.sourceforge.net/)

NetHogs is not available in official RHEL/CentOS repositories, so let us add EPEL repository to install NetHogs:

# rpm -Uhv http://dl.fedoraproject.org/pub/epel/6/i386/epel-release-6-8.noarch.rpm

Then install NetHogs using the command:

 # yum install nethogs -y

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