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Archive for January, 2014

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Repost: Apple iOS development process using Flash Builder

Repost: Apple iOS development process using Flash Builder

Before developing an iOS application using Flash Builder, it is important to understand the iOS development process and how to obtain the required certificates from Apple.

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Repost: Test and debug a mobile application on a device

Repost: Test and debug a mobile application on a device

You can use Flash Builder to test or debug a mobile application from your development desktop or from a device.

You test and debug applications based on a launch configuration that you define. Flash Builder shares the launch configuration between running and debugging the application. When you use Flash Builder to debug an application on a device, Flash Builder installs a debug version of the application on the device.

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Repost: Desktop video conference preparation: How to calculate bandwidth

Repost: Desktop video conference preparation: How to calculate bandwidth

Video conferencing is a challenging application for business networks. Not only does it require assured bandwidth per call, but it needs very low packet loss ( less than .1% over 5 minutes) and tightly controlled jitter (less than 40 milliseconds). Meeting these requirements on a converged network requires that Quality of Service (QoS) be implemented end-to-end. To prevent the oversubscription of bandwidth, video conferencing also requires either call admission control (CAC) or carefully calculated bandwidth for every call. – Stephen K. Campbell

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Repost: How does Facebook Work?

Repost: How does Facebook Work?

Facebook uses a variety of services, tools, and programming languages to make up its core infrastructure. At the front end, their servers run a LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP) stack with Memcache.

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Repost: Supermicro IPMI Configuration through BIOS or Web Interface

Repost: Supermicro IPMI Configuration through BIOS or Web Interface

This article will describe the network configuration for full remote management for the Supermicro by means of the BIOS or a web interface. Full remote management includes the Intelligent Platform Management Interface (IPMI), a web interface for maintenance and configuration and Keyboard – Video -Mouse (KVM) over IP.

How to use UNIX/LINUX Shutdown Command?

Shutdown the machine immediately

You can shutdown the machine immediately using the following command. It notifies all the logged in users about the system going down, and shuts down the machine.

# shutdown -h now

Broadcast message from john@example.com
	(/dev/pts/1) at 15:28 ...

The system is going down for halt NOW!

Reboot the machine immediately

You can reboot the machine immediately using the following command. It notifies all the logged in users about the system reboot.

# shutdown -r now

Broadcast message from john@example.com
	(/dev/pts/1) at 15:28 ...

The system is going down for reboot NOW!

How to fix: “Another MySQL daemon already running with the same unix socket.”

You can see this error when restarting MySQL. The system has detected that MySQL is running when it is not. This is probably due to and hard reboot of the system.

To fix this problem, remove the file /var/lib/mysql/mysql.sock as root user:

# rm /var/lib/mysql/mysql.sock

Then start the MySQL daemon:

# service mysqld start

 or

# /etc/init.d/mysqld start

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Repost: Everything You Should Know About Supermicro IPMI

Repost: Everything You Should Know About Supermicro IPMI

I have a few tips to ensure your Supermicro IPMI configurations are easy to manage and deal with,

  1. When possible have the IPMI Web Interface on a private network (not facing the internet).
  2. Always patch IPMI to the latest firmware release.
  3. Always patch the underlying motherboard BIOS to the latest release.
  4. Always disable the default user account and any guest / anonymous user accounts
  5. Create a custom admin login that is not the default “ADMIN”.
  6. Document and know how to use the varying Supermicro IPMI cmd line utilities, just in case!

 

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Repost: Running IPMI on Linux

Repost: Running IPMI on Linux

What is IPMI?

IPMI is standard which allows remote server management, primarily developed by Intel. IPMI cards, known as Baseboard Management Cards (BMCs) are primitive computers in their own right and are operational all the time, so long as the server has a power source. The server itself does not need to be powered on, or the operating system operational for the BMC to work, it just needs a power source to be connected to the server.

The primary benefits of IPMI are:

  • View server chassis and motherboard sensor output remotely, such as chassis status and intrusion detection.
  • Ability to remotely power on, power off, reboot the server and flash the identification light.
  • Ability to set up a console on a serial port and have the BMC redirect that console over a network port, which in cooperation with BIOS level console redirection, gives you the ability to view the BIOS, bootloader, bootup and shutdown procedures and console output should the machine hang or lock up, just as you would if you were interacting with the machine locally. This is called Serial Over Lan (SOL) and is available in IPMI v2.0 as a standard and using non-standard proprietary methods in v1.5.

Essentially, IPMI will save you from a few hundred to over a thousand GBP instead of buying a remote power control unit and SOL will save you the same amount again over buying an IP KVM.

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Repost: IPMI on CentOS/RHEL

Repost: IPMI on CentOS/RHEL

The Intelligent Platform Management Interface (IPMI) is a standardized computer system interface used by system administrators for out-of-band management of computer systems and monitoring of their operation. It is a way to manage a computer that may be powered off or otherwise unresponsive by using a network connection to the hardware rather than to an operating system or login shell. – Wikipedia.org

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